5 Incredible Mouth and Teeth Myths

We all like a myth. Legends are based upon them. However, what may be good in storytelling is certainly bad when it comes to your teeth. In this, it is best to have all of the facts right, or it may affect your mouth and in the worst case your overall health.

But why are there so many falsehoods, or maybe put differently, exaggerations or things we are confident are correct but are not? It possibly comes down to the fact that parents like to preach to their young ones about oral hygiene and this information is handed down as the progeny expands.

Could it also be the medical establishment’s fault for some of the misinformation? Maybe. But what is for certain is that science has come along way since Queen Elizabeth the First of England lost all of her teeth due to her sweet tooth.

So, let’s dive in there and take a good look at some interesting myths that have established themselves.

A Harder Brush Is Better

Hard BurshYou have certainly heard of this one. Myth or the truth? Definitely the first of the two options. If you brush too firmly with a hard toothbrush, you may be getting all of the grime and bacteria off of your tooth enamel, but you are also damaging the gums.

And that is detrimental to the overall structure of your mouth.

Why?

Simply because a receding gum line causes teeth to become wobbly over time and ultimately leading to them falling out. Also, bleeding gums invite infection which is generally bad but even worse so in the mouth.

Take it easy and go with a medium brush and use it wisely by tilting it at a forty-five-degree angle to the to the gum line and brush from side-to-side.

See the top recommended toothbrushes:

My kid does not eat all that much sugar

This one is a classic. If you are a parent, there is a significant chance that you have fallen for this one. And you’d be right on one thing – too much candy and soft drinks are not a good idea. A small hint here, do not force your child to brush immediately after consumption of such things but opt for rinsing instead and follow up 45 minutes later with a brush.

Sugar or sucrose is not necessarily the overall bad guy. But there is one hidden culprit that thrives off the stuff – bacteria. And, hand in glove, there are more foods that you think are better as a treat than a fizzy drink.

Get your kid to chew on a carrot or an apple. Fruit and veg are full of carbs, and the aforementioned bacterium really grows in it. So, in this case, also make sure you maintain good oral hygiene after eating and drinking.

Education: Does Sugar Negatively Affect Your Teeth?

It’s Too Late For Braces

Myth on BracesThis is another myth. It is becoming more and more popular for people of all ages to have braces. Keeping everything in order in the mouth does not end when you get older. It is a lifelong process. So, make a friend out of your dentist because you will be seeing a lot of him or her.

If you already have braces check out the top-rated toothbrushes here.

The Older You Get The More Teeth You Lose

Maybe true in the Middle Ages or at the beginning of the last century, but not today. If you consistently looked after your teeth throughout your life the chances are high that you will never lose one.

Whiter Teeth Are Healthier Teeth

Nearly everyone wants them but not for health purposes. We just want to look good.

Consider reading: Top Teeth Whitener Products & Systems for 2018

The color of one’s teeth has no bearing on a person’s health. Darker teeth depend on the individual. And actually, the veneer over the tooth is partially translucent, and what lies beneath it is naturally of a yellowish or greyish color. Those folks with bedazzling pearly whites are not necessarily better off on the tooth strength scale.

Well, that was fun. Next time you exchange words with your kids or someone boasting their dental display of magnificent whiteness in your face you can rest assured that you might be the one with the teeth in old age.

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